The Corner Of Seemore And Didless

The Corner of Seemore and Didless

Exploring the Indian Graves Road, just north of Chain Lakes. It was beautiful despite the mud and fresh spring snow.
Beaver spring. The fat furry rodents are thriving and prolific in the foothills.
Alone. Security in obscurity. Imagine a winter night alone with a tiny wood stove and a flickering lantern. Coyote’s howl as the wind moans around your tiny abode. But, first came the tiny home…
…Then came the little red barn.
A view to die for
In the lee under a cold front

After my boat inspections were complete and truck repairs were finished I sallied forth hoping to take a day or too just for being and taking some photos. I love the foothill country of Alberta and actually concede to a growing affection for the wide open flat country and the big blue sky overhead. I also hold a delight for old buildings and there are still a few of those standing. Eventually I found a place to park for the night where I could see for miles in all directions. I hunkered down to watch the ever-changing light and the sun setting through an approaching storm. The next day I poked about in the Old Man River area. The weather flipped between snow squalls and exquisite warm sunny spells. It was an exquisite day. Here are some of my photos.

It’s about a lifestyle
Apparently a local tradition that goes for miles.
Set for the night at the corner of Seemore And Didless
In the morning
Bitter cold a breathtaking light
At that corner the winding moaned in the poles and wires
Storm’s end
An hour later
A split decision
To my great delight I found the Cowley Sailplane Airfield. Once again I was a child at a grass airstrip, and the memories came flooding back.
Says it all
Many sailplane altitude records have been set from this field.
The launching winch. It is parked at the upwind end of the active runway and the line is hooked to a sailplane at the opposite end. On a signal the aircraft is winched forward at high speed. By the time the the sailplane releases the line it can be at 2000′ when it passes above the winch.
A rare find, it still works…and I know how to work it.
The water was sulphurous.
Great faded pen art.
The old horse shed. Note the gnawed board on the stable gate.
Hay the modern way.
The ubiquitous symbol of modern Alberta. Up and down, round and round, sucking raw crude out of the ground.
Earth, wind, sky, horses.

What a thousand acres of Silphiums looked like when they tickled the bellies of the buffalo is a question never again to be answered, and perhaps not even asked.”
― Aldo Leopold, A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There

Author: Fred Bailey

Fred is a slightly-past middle age sailor /, writer / photographer with plenty of eclectic hands-on skills and experiences. Some would describe him as the old hippy who doesn't know the war is over. He is certainly reluctant to grow up and readily admits to being the eternal dreamer. He has written several books including two novels, 'The Keeper' and 'Storm Ecstasy,' as well as 'The Water Rushing By', 'Sins Of The Fathers', 'The Magic Stick', as well as an extensive inventory of poetry, essays, short stories, anecdotes and photographs. His first passion is the ocean, sailboats, voyaging and all those people who are similarly drawn to the sea. He lived aboard and extensively cruised the BC Coast on 'Seafire' the boat he refitted to go voyaging, to explore new horizons both inner and outer. This blog was about that journey and the preparations for it. Circumstances prevailed which forced the sale of his beloved vessel. Now on a different tack, the voyage continues. If you follow this blog your interest may provide some of the energy that helps fuel the journey. Namaste Contact me at svpaxboat@gmail.com

8 thoughts on “The Corner Of Seemore And Didless”

  1. Enjoyed our tour around the Alberta foothills. Love that area! I miss the rolling foothills and the big sky. Safe travels. Karen & Ole

  2. Love you eye for the beauty and serenity of an otherwise barren flat land. Wonder if the breeze filled with fresh cattle dung sapidity has aroused some long past cognitive process.
    Do remember driving across the Prairies from Ontario a couple of times and looking for a pot hole in the road to drive through for excitement.
    Cheers, Tony

    1. Absolutely cognitive therapy. For excitement I can always speculate about the next Alberta license plate hurtling toward me and wonder if they’re texting or sleeping.

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