NUTS!

The classic pose. Red squirrel sitting on a limb eating a pine seed. I have no illusion about any affection from him. I’m just another potential threat but he does like the peanuts I set out.

There have been no grand events in my existence since last blog. I’ve been trying to complete the restoration of two small boats and I’ve been feeling poorly so I’ve stuck close to home. In a few more days I’ll be on the road after a half-year here at Koocanusa Lake. There are all sorts of Covid 49 paranoias so my travel plans are on hold and it’s best to get home to Vancouver Island before we are all back under house arrest.

Bull pine seeds. A free tree in every one.
Along the way. The center of Jaffray, a village on the way to town. The general store is also the post office. Bets on the age of this sign?
No Bull! Drive carefully. There’s nothing like sliding around a corner on wet pavement and seeing such a beast standing on the center line with his head down. There are herds of cattle, and deer and elk. The newcomers are easy to recognize by how fast they drive. Say moo!
Squirelly! Whazzup? Deer and other wildlife use the squirrel as an early alert system.
Home from the range. This steer showed up to sample the sweet grass just behind my camper. Squirelly didn’t get upset about him and the other cattle.
Hoof it! The brand reads B bar C. as in “property of.”

 

My high life lately has been worrying about and photographing my little pal Squirelly. He continues to survive the Cat Team, two feral cats that have learned to hunt as a pair and are apparently quite accomplished. Squirelly sits high up on a limb, munching on pine cone seeds and broadcasting the screaming meemies to all whenever the deadly duo come anywhere near. I find myself worrying about the little guy (I’ve decided it’s a he) but he seems to be a survivor. He’ll soon have to fend for himself all on his own, as if he hadn’t before he moved into the hood. Here are some recent photos of Squirelly and his buddies.

Squirelly can sit on a limb with his mouth full of pine cone and cuss the whole world for  hours.
Since I’ve parked my bike against the tree Squirelly has decided the seat is a great lookout spot before the final dash to his den entrance.
Run over by a squirrel.
“Made it!”
“Is it safe? Damned cats!”
“No, I won’t come sit on your knee but I’m getting a taste for these big seed things you keep putting out.”
“Just one more.”
The moral of the story:
“Somedays it’s best to just grab the nut and run.”

Animals don’t hate, and we’re supposed to be better than them.”
― Elvis Presley

Author: Fred Bailey

Fred is a slightly-past middle age sailor /, writer / photographer with plenty of eclectic hands-on skills and experiences. Some would describe him as the old hippy who doesn't know the war is over. He is certainly reluctant to grow up and readily admits to being the eternal dreamer. He has written several books including two novels, 'The Keeper' and 'Storm Ecstasy,' as well as 'The Water Rushing By', 'Sins Of The Fathers', 'The Magic Stick', as well as an extensive inventory of poetry, essays, short stories, anecdotes and photographs. His first passion is the ocean, sailboats, voyaging and all those people who are similarly drawn to the sea. He lived aboard and extensively cruised the BC Coast on 'Seafire' the boat he refitted to go voyaging, to explore new horizons both inner and outer. This blog was about that journey and the preparations for it. Circumstances prevailed which forced the sale of his beloved vessel. Now on a different tack, the voyage continues. If you follow this blog your interest may provide some of the energy that helps fuel the journey. Namaste Contact me at svpaxboat@gmail.com

2 thoughts on “NUTS!”

  1. LOL, Fred, your Squirrelly bears a strong resemblance to our own little Squirrelly – both are exceedingly cute, and smart. Ours lives most of the year on Douglas fir cone seeds, but this week he/she has been dining on fresh plums it seems. A. was out in the yard yesterday when he spotted Squirrelly in the tree, making off with a fat plum in his/her mouth. We checked the tree a few hours later and couldn’t find a single plum left! Fortunately we had already harvested all the plums we can deal with, so it’s no loss to us. I just hope Squirrelly has a way of drying those plums or he/she is going to have a lot of rotten fruit on his paws! 🙂

    1. Laurie:

      My sqirelly has no fruit that I know of and it took him a few days to work out the peanuts were edible. In Nanaimo, my sister had a grey squirrel who has worked diligently at stripping a groanoign plum tree until he, himself, is rather plum-shaped. They ate among gods little capitalists! Squirrels rule!
      Fred

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